wabbits

sneaky_pete000

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I took off the week of Christmas again this year and it flew by. We did the typical Christmas stuff, which was all great - but the highlights were some of the outdoor adventures we had. My parents bought my 9yr old daughter her first gun, a Mossberg Muddy Girl .22. Lots of plastic on it, but perfect for her, and I really don't have to worry about scratched stocks, etc. We headed out chasing some cottontails on the farm and immediately got into one. But....her older brother was there too, who happens to be a pretty good shot with his own .22, and the rabbit never made it to her. I had all 3 kids, including my 6yr old, with his "daisy magnum"along with my nephew. They had a blast. IMG_3621.jpg

A little later I headed back out with Ethan and a cousin, grabbing 3 more. We battered and deep fried them this time, but none of us liked it that much, so I think we'll head back to stew. Hank Shaw seems to have some interesting ways to cook them, which we might try next time. IMG_3626.jpg

http://honest-food.net/wild-game/rabbit-hare-squirrel-recipes/

I also stumbled upon another of my old treestands. Sometimes I'm not sure if I had more fun building treestands, or hunting deer from those treestands. IMG_3625.jpg

Here's a question for those of you that chase rabbits without hounds - what do you wear for pants? I used to get away with the double material Carhartts, but now that those wild rose bushes are rampant, its not enough. I need something with a tougher layer of material on the outside, but don't want to drop $70 on a pair of "upland pants" that I'm not sure will hold up to them anyway. I was trying to find some type of tough nylon I might be able to sew onto some regular Carhartts. Any thoughts?
 

Lavman

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Great hunting times right there, thanks for sharing. How do you go about hunting wabbits without a dog? You guys push them to each other or spot and stalk or ???
 

sneaky_pete000

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Great hunting times right there, thanks for sharing. How do you go about hunting wabbits without a dog? You guys push them to each other or spot and stalk or ???
Cottontails don't go to far when you bump them, so its usually a combination of both. Usually we head into a fenceline, or a narrow brushy area, I put the shooters on either side of me by about 30 yards, and I walk up through the middle. If we're using shotguns, we try to take them on the run, but if we're using the .22's, we go into spot/stalk mode once we see one. Everyone else freezes while the person that spotted it sneaks in. You probably only have hares in your area though I'm guessing? When I hunted those without a dog, it was tracking. I just walked until I found a track, then got on it. Usually there's only 1 or 2 tracks in the spots I'm in, so its possible to track them down. The cottontails will have TONS of tracks in a little area, so its usually impossible to track those, in my experience.
 

Escout711

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Here's a question for those of you that chase rabbits without hounds - what do you wear for pants? I used to get away with the double material Carhartts, but now that those wild rose bushes are rampant, its not enough. I need something with a tougher layer of material on the outside, but don't want to drop $70 on a pair of "upland pants" that I'm not sure will hold up to them anyway. I was trying to find some type of tough nylon I might be able to sew onto some regular Carhartts. Any thoughts?

How about a cheap set of chaps like these? I hate multiflora rose with a passion, it's rampant behind my house, and the stuff is awful.

http://www.cabelas.com/product/CABELAS-DRY-PLUS-PERFORMANCE-UPLAND-CHAP/1808450.uts?productVariantId=3834237&WT.tsrc=PPC&WT.mc_id=GoogleProductAds&WT.z_mc_id1=03867817&rid=20&gclid=CMDAmqj-qNECFcOKswod7VcCIQ&gclsrc=aw.ds
 

RememberBaker

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This has always been my favorite rabbit recipe, it used to be featured in Marlin ads in the late 70's.


SHENANDOAH VALLEY RABBIT CASSEROLE
1 or 2 rabbits, depending on size
1/2 tsp. salt
Fresh, ground pepper to taste
1/2 tsp. thyme
2 or 3 lg. bay leaves
5 slices bacon, cut into strips
1 c. water
1 c. seasoned bread crumbs
Clean and cut rabbits into serving size pieces. Soak young rabbits 1 to 2 hours, in salt water, 12 to 18 hours for older rabbits, 1 teaspoon salt per quart of water. After soaking, warp meat in damp cloth and store overnight in cold place. Butter a casserole dish large enough to hold pieces. Put in a layer of rabbit, sprinkle with salt, pepper and thyme and add bay leaves. Add a layer of bacon pieces. Repeat until all ingredients are used up. Pour water over casserole, cover and bake at 350 degrees for 1 to 2 hours, until rabbit is tender. Remove cover and sprinkle seasoned bread crumbs over rabbit. Bake 30 minutes longer and serve with broccoli, rye bread and assorted garden vegetables.
 

sneaky_pete000

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The reviews look good, have you used them? I'm hesitant to even spend $50 on something that might be shredded immediately after pushing through the roses. That stuff really has taken off, and I've never encountered thorns like that before. The rabbits love it though.
 

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Cottontails don't go to far when you bump them, so its usually a combination of both. Usually we head into a fenceline, or a narrow brushy area, I put the shooters on either side of me by about 30 yards, and I walk up through the middle. If we're using shotguns, we try to take them on the run, but if we're using the .22's, we go into spot/stalk mode once we see one. Everyone else freezes while the person that spotted it sneaks in. You probably only have hares in your area though I'm guessing? When I hunted those without a dog, it was tracking. I just walked until I found a track, then got on it. Usually there's only 1 or 2 tracks in the spots I'm in, so its possible to track them down. The cottontails will have TONS of tracks in a little area, so its usually impossible to track those, in my experience.
I see. You are right, I have only seen snowshoe hares around my house, had a big one lurking around in the early mornings last summer eating off the lawn. A friend of mine has a beagle and he is going to run rabbits this winter near here seems like a good time.
 

sneaky_pete000

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This has always been my favorite rabbit recipe, it used to be featured in Marlin ads in the late 70's.


SHENANDOAH VALLEY RABBIT CASSEROLE
1 or 2 rabbits, depending on size
1/2 tsp. salt
Fresh, ground pepper to taste
1/2 tsp. thyme
2 or 3 lg. bay leaves
5 slices bacon, cut into strips
1 c. water
1 c. seasoned bread crumbs
Clean and cut rabbits into serving size pieces. Soak young rabbits 1 to 2 hours, in salt water, 12 to 18 hours for older rabbits, 1 teaspoon salt per quart of water. After soaking, warp meat in damp cloth and store overnight in cold place. Butter a casserole dish large enough to hold pieces. Put in a layer of rabbit, sprinkle with salt, pepper and thyme and add bay leaves. Add a layer of bacon pieces. Repeat until all ingredients are used up. Pour water over casserole, cover and bake at 350 degrees for 1 to 2 hours, until rabbit is tender. Remove cover and sprinkle seasoned bread crumbs over rabbit. Bake 30 minutes longer and serve with broccoli, rye bread and assorted garden vegetables.
Sounds interesting, I'll give it a shot.
 

Lavman

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The reviews look good, have you used them? I'm hesitant to even spend $50 on something that might be shredded immediately after pushing through the roses. That stuff really has taken off, and I've never encountered thorns like that before. The rabbits love it though.
Try your chainsaw chaps
 

sneaky_pete000

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Try your chainsaw chaps
Yeah, those would definitely guard my legs, but I think they have too much texture to move through the roses. I need something "harder", if that makes sense, so the thorns can't get a grip. Maybe I'm wrong though, and should give it a shot.
 

sneaky_pete000

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I see. You are right, I have only seen snowshoe hares around my house, had a big one lurking around in the early mornings last summer eating off the lawn. A friend of mine has a beagle and he is going to run rabbits this winter near here seems like a good time.
Hunting with a dog is awesome. Tons of fun, and WAY easier than doing it without a dog.
 

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Over in Tinmouth we have a section we call "the briar patch" and it has the meanest thorns I have ever encountered. These things are like an inch long, sharp as a pin and once they get a hold of you they don't let go. The deer have little tunnels they sneak in there and hide, year before this I got tore up good in there trying to root a buck out. This year when I went back over there I brought hand pruners with me thinking if I had to crawl through there again I would cut myself through. I do think cutting a swath through it with a flamethrower would be a good time.
 

Escout711

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The reviews look good, have you used them? I'm hesitant to even spend $50 on something that might be shredded immediately after pushing through the roses. That stuff really has taken off, and I've never encountered thorns like that before. The rabbits love it though.
I have not, however, since it's from Cabelas, it's guaranteed. If you feel real fancy, you could get Filson chaps, but damn they are expensive!
 

Escout711

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Over in Tinmouth we have a section we call "the briar patch" and it has the meanest thorns I have ever encountered. These things are like an inch long, sharp as a pin and once they get a hold of you they don't let go. The deer have little tunnels they sneak in there and hide, year before this I got tore up good in there trying to root a buck out. This year when I went back over there I brought hand pruners with me thinking if I had to crawl through there again I would cut myself through. I do think cutting a swath through it with a flamethrower would be a good time.
Here in southeast MA, we have greenbrier. Greenbrier is insane. The thorns aren't scary sharp, they are like the tip of a nail. What is crazy about greenbrier is the way it grows. It's a creeping vine, it'll run 30' feet up trees. The stuff is like concertina wire, it wraps around your feet and grabs you. in open spots in the woods, it grows in rolls. The tensile strength is ridiculous, you have to cut it, it's too strong to just rip it.



 

Meatseeker

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Here in southeast MA, we have greenbrier. Greenbrier is insane. The thorns aren't scary sharp, they are like the tip of a nail. What is crazy about greenbrier is the way it grows. It's a creeping vine, it'll run 30' feet up trees. The stuff is like concertina wire, it wraps around your feet and grabs you. in open spots in the woods, it grows in rolls. The tensile strength is ridiculous, you have to cut it, it's too strong to just rip it.



what is even more crazy is that the deer down here eat it!
 

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Mother Nature's concertina wire! I am glad we don't have a lot of it around, quite miserable to contend with.
 

sneaky_pete000

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Over in Tinmouth we have a section we call "the briar patch" and it has the meanest thorns I have ever encountered. These things are like an inch long, sharp as a pin and once they get a hold of you they don't let go. The deer have little tunnels they sneak in there and hide, year before this I got tore up good in there trying to root a buck out. This year when I went back over there I brought hand pruners with me thinking if I had to crawl through there again I would cut myself through. I do think cutting a swath through it with a flamethrower would be a good time.
Tinmouth has some good cottontail areas...Did you see any rabbit sign in there?
 


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