Timberframe House Build

Mainewoods

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Travis,
That’s some mad skills, and a beautiful home! It’s like a piece of art work, even down to notching out where the electrical will sit. I’ve got to stop by and see it sometime when I’m up that way.
 

Mountain Hunter

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Travis,

Your house turned out great! You are a true craftsman and it shows in the photos. I'm glad you are moved in. Next fall you can focus on hunting again! By the looks of the photos, it was worth missing a little time this fall to button it up.
 

sneaky_pete000

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Someday, 250yrs from now, someone is going to walk into that building and still be impressed by the craftsmanship. I walk into our old barns, look around and think "How the hell did they accomplish this with those primitive tools?" 250yrs from now, all your tools and resources will seem ancient. Nice work dude, thats incredibly beautiful.

If you shoot skeet in the backyard, will you wake up Browseline?
 

Browseline

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Someday, 250yrs from now, someone is going to walk into that building and still be impressed by the craftsmanship. I walk into our old barns, look around and think "How the hell did they accomplish this with those primitive tools?" 250yrs from now, all your tools and resources will seem ancient. Nice work dude, thats incredibly beautiful.

If you shoot skeet in the backyard, will you wake up Browseline?
Travis is 1.53 miles straight line from me so I'll hear him shoot as long as I am outside. If it is daylight out, I'll be awake...…...other than an occasional nap in the recliner or out on the deck.

Like I said in another post, Travis's house is a masterpiece of post and beam construction. And he and his wife did it all in their spare time while holding down full time jobs and keeping track of two children.
 

medrhunter

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Thanks for that detail.
I can only dream of buying a place that has that much quality and craftsmanship.
Amazing. Great job.
 

Big D

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Wow. I'm not even sure what to say. Simply beautiful. I've built a couple of camps over the years but I might just as well have been building bird houses compared to that. Beyond impressive. Love the old chainsaws hanging in the mill. I'm assuming you work from a set of plans for all that joinery? Do you draw them up yourself also? What is the R value for those wall/roof panels?
 
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Shooter Buck

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Great work. Our friend just built his house in a similar way and it is amazing to see it all come together. A lot of hard work make a beautiful home with a great story to go with it.
 

NH Hunter

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as someone in the building industry...... That's beautiful work. You must drink your morning coffee with a big smile as you should. Your home is certainly something to be proud of for generations to come. Very well done. Thanks for taking the time to write it up and show some awesome pics.
 

802-603hunter

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I'm assuming you work from a set of plans for all that joinery? Do you draw them up yourself also? What is the R value for those wall/roof panels?
I drew up a full set of plans in CAD. Foundation, floor plans, elevations, panel layouts, and all my timber frame drawings. I have all of my standardized joinery details stored away in memory so those aren’t drawn out. I can cut most pieces only knowing two or three critical dimensions specific to that piece. The wall panels are R-23 and the roof R-29, but it is a solid, uninterrupted insulation plane so as a complete system it performs a bit higher. I also strapped and sheathed over the panels to create a vented roof.
 

Big D

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I can remember some of the earlier panels would connect with a spline in between them which would create a thermal bridge into the building but it sound like these do not. Am I correct in assuming the way you did the roof was to not make the envelope too tight? Anything else that you did to let the building breath a little bit? Don't mean to inundate you wth questions but I'm always interested in different perspectives.
 

802-603hunter

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I can remember some of the earlier panels would connect with a spline in between them which would create a thermal bridge into the building but it sound like these do not. Am I correct in assuming the way you did the roof was to not make the envelope too tight? Anything else that you did to let the building breath a little bit? Don't mean to inundate you wth questions but I'm always interested in different perspectives.
These panels have a small 3” wide plywood spline on the back side of the OSB to join the panels, but there is no thermal break through the whole thickness of the panel. Each joint has a channel that gets filled with spray foam about midway through its thickness. The envelope is pretty tight. The added layer on the roof is to create a cold roof (vented at soffits and ridge) versus a “hot” roof. It added a lot of extra work but it should be worth it in the long run. I am in the process of installing an ERV system (energy recovery ventilator) which is basically a ducted fresh air system with a heat exchanger to preheat the fresh sir supply using the exhaust air. My dad and I are working on that during the night shift. We have been running multiple dehumidifiers in the interim as the timbers are stood up green and continue to season/dry out.
 

Big D

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These panels have a small 3” wide plywood spline on the back side of the OSB to join the panels, but there is no thermal break through the whole thickness of the panel. Each joint has a channel that gets filled with spray foam about midway through its thickness. The envelope is pretty tight. The added layer on the roof is to create a cold roof (vented at soffits and ridge) versus a “hot” roof. It added a lot of extra work but it should be worth it in the long run. I am in the process of installing an ERV system (energy recovery ventilator) which is basically a ducted fresh air system with a heat exchanger to preheat the fresh sir supply using the exhaust air. My dad and I are working on that during the night shift. We have been running multiple dehumidifiers in the interim as the timbers are stood up green and continue to season/dry out.
Thanks for the info. ERV is what I was thinking of. That will serve you well.
 




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