NH Moose Lottery

Meatseeker

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I've been in since 2006. I drew a tag the very first time I applied. I killed a DIY cow on the very last day in zone C2. I'm hoping to draw again some day.
 

802-603hunter

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I applied for points only this year, too busy building our house to dedicate the time to a hunt. Pretty sure I am 0 for 17 or 18 at this point. I guided a friend who got drawn on his first try as a non-resident in 2009. He took a 42” bull on the third day after having some close calls with bigger bulls the first two days.
 

mowbizz

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Tried for years and gave up...I think they should hold off on the hunt for 5 years to either let the herd recuperate or somehow fix the tick problem. Probably can’t be fixed but they sure can stop the hunt if they want to.
 

outdoorsman

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Tried for years and gave up...I think they should hold off on the hunt for 5 years to either let the herd recuperate or somehow fix the tick problem. Probably can’t be fixed but they sure can stop the hunt if they want to.
The tick issue is moose density and climate dependent. Answer is change the climate or decrease moose density to brake the host/parasite cycle.
 

Igloo

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I have six points, I believe. Only started hunting anything in 2013, so I obviously don't have a long history racking up points.

If I get drawn, I'll need to take unpaid vacation time for it. Oh well..
 

shawn_in_MA

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I'm in. I was drawn in 2014. Last year was my first year back in the lottery...so I have a whopping 2 points going in. I drew Maine this year...so I'm actually hoping my name doesn't get drawn LOL
 

sneaky_pete000

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The tick issue is moose density and climate dependent. Answer is change the climate or decrease moose density to brake the host/parasite cycle.
I think this is one of the single hardest things for the general public to understand. Lowering densities in the short term can give huge long term benefits. Hunters can lower that density in a controlled method, or the ticks can in a "bust" cycle method.
 

sneaky_pete000

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Forest fires are a option though forest fires are not accepted well and private landowners don’t like to see their timber value disappear.
I read a study that showed ticks almost disappeared in year 1 after prescribed fire, but came back with an increase in subsequent years. This was definitely not a winter tick study though - it was one of the southern schools that did it, so I'm not sure if it would apply to this or not.
 

outdoorsman

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I read a study that showed ticks almost disappeared in year 1 after prescribed fire, but came back with an increase in subsequent years. This was definitely not a winter tick study though - it was one of the southern schools that did it, so I'm not sure if it would apply to this or not.

Thanks! I’ll find that article.
 

mowbizz

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I think this is one of the single hardest things for the general public to understand. Lowering densities in the short term can give huge long term benefits. Hunters can lower that density in a controlled method, or the ticks can in a "bust" cycle method.
Hard to comprehend this theory...seems to me that less moose and the same amount of ticks would equal more moose death?
Ticks will always be around. Not arguing...just can’t follow the logic of lower densities meaning more moose.
Smarter folks than me must be correct in their thinking.
Has lowering densities by hunting actually caused any increase in moose yet?
 

outdoorsman

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Hard to comprehend this theory...seems to me that less moose and the same amount of ticks would equal more moose death?
Ticks will always be around. Not arguing...just can’t follow the logic of lower densities meaning more moose.
Smarter folks than me must be correct in their thinking.
Has lowering densities by hunting actually caused any increase in moose yet?
Winter tick are a one host species. They live their life on one animal from the fall to the spring. Moose are lousy groomers supporting 30,000-100,000 ticks. These ticks drop off the host during the late winter/early spring to lay eggs. The eggs hatch, quest in the fall, and start the process over. At .25 moose per square mile or less the cycle diminishes.

Other wildlife, including deer, groom very well. Therefore, other wildlife do not support winter tick. Meaning winter tick do not have an alternate host to keep the tick numbers up in the absence of moose.


Lowering populations to 1/2 carrying capacity (known as maximum sustained yield - MSY) creates the highest number of young per adult female. In the MSY scenario birth rates are controlled by food availability. Currently moose are at carrying capacity per the winter tick cycle (not food availability) in northern parts of the state. Other parts of the state had witnessed brain worm impacts. Overall, impacts to moose vary by region.

Fortunately the southwestern part of NH has witnessed moose numbers rise over the past 2 years. The central part of NH has various reports of increased sightings. The 2019 deer hunter survey data will give a good description of what each moose management district is experiencing with density changes.

Overall, managing moose populations (or any wildlife) is more complicated than what it appears to be on the surface.

Worth reading:

https://wildlife.state.nh.us/hunting/documents/wj-whats-bugging-our-moose.pdf
 
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NH Mountains

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I’m in with 13 or 14 points. I was drawn in 2001.
I’m 0 forever. Never been drawn but, was 4th alternate several years ago and didn’t make it. Got the maximum points but, I’m
Not holding my breath.
 

mowbizz

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Winter tick are a one host species. They live their life on one animal from the fall to the spring. Moose are lousy groomers supporting 30,000-100,000 ticks. These ticks drop in the host during the late winter/early spring to lay eggs. The eggs hatch, quest in the fall, and start the process over. At .25 moose per square mile or less the cycle diminishes.

Other wildlife, including deer, groom very well. Therefore, other wildlife do not support winter tick. Meaning winter tick do not have an alternate host to keep the tick numbers up in the absence of moose.


Lowering populations to 1/2 carrying capacity (known as maximum sustained yield - MSY) creates the highest number of young per adult female. In the MSY scenario birth rates are controlled by food availability. Currently moose are at carrying capacity per the winter tick cycle (not food availability) in northern parts of the state. Other parts of the state had witnessed brain worm impacts. Overall, impacts to moose vary by region.

Fortunately the southwestern part of NH has witnessed moose numbers rise over the past 2 years. The central part of NH has various reports of increased sightings. The 2019 deer hunter survey data will give a good description of what each moose management district is experiencing with density changes.

Overall, managing moose populations (or any wildlife) is more complicated than what it appears to be on the surface.

Worth reading:

https://wildlife.state.nh.us/hunting/documents/wj-whats-bugging-our-moose.pdf
Thank you!
 

Igloo

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I know that my property is hardly enough to be statistically significant, but I typically get 10-20 moose sightings (camera and personal) per year in central NH. I have yet to encounter a moose who showed signs of winter tick or brain worm. Many of my moose videos are essentially point-blank (ie. they're drawn to the camera), so I can see individual hairs.

This year has been gangbusters for moose. Last fall I found a new trail and thought it might be worth a trail camera. I get more moose on that camera than deer or bears. Also had a moose come by last month while I was hunting turkey. I'd say I already have more moose showing up on this property already than I had all of last year.

The outfitters are puzzled why I insist on listing Zone G high on my list of preferred moose zones.
 

longbow

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I know that my property is hardly enough to be statistically significant, but I typically get 10-20 moose sightings (camera and personal) per year in central NH. I have yet to encounter a moose who showed signs of winter tick or brain worm. Many of my moose videos are essentially point-blank (ie. they're drawn to the camera), so I can see individual hairs.

This year has been gangbusters for moose. Last fall I found a new trail and thought it might be worth a trail camera. I get more moose on that camera than deer or bears. Also had a moose come by last month while I was hunting turkey. I'd say I already have more moose showing up on this property already than I had all of last year.

The outfitters are puzzled why I insist on listing Zone G high on my list of preferred moose zones.
Any nice bulls?
 

Igloo

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Any nice bulls?
Absolutely, although I'd say I more often see momma with baby than anything else.

In 2015 (I think), I got a beautiful video of a bull shedding its velvet. I had never seen it before, so at first I was puzzled by the sight.

Problem is, looking back, they do seem to disappear come October.
 

NH Mountains

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I kept my streak alive. Good luck this fall to any who got drawn.
 


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