New Lanny Benoit Interview

longbow

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After years of reading their books, watching videos etc..

The key to their hunting style is . DRIVE A LOT OF MILES AND DON'T HUNT UNTIL YOU FIND A TRACK. It is referred to many times in their books, interviews etc., but never spelled out like I did.

Not putting them down at all, but when there is snow that is what you do. Like he said it is getting tougher these days to find a track and it has forced them into the woods to look, go to Ontario etc..

Now..., there is a lot to finding a track, analysis of the track, deciding whether it is big enough, fresh enough, and where it is heading. And...being able to physically and mentally follow the track wherever it goes, without getting lost. That is what they are good at. Maybe the best.
 

NH Hunter

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I think knowing when to speed up , slow down, when to circle , keeping that track when it gets in with other deer, especially on a couple day old snow. They've always prided themselves on shooting too. I think at one time Shane, Lanny and Lane were all state champ trap shooters. That's a lot of shooting to take two barrels out.
 

Huntermc6

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I think knowing when to speed up , slow down, when to circle , keeping that track when it gets in with other deer, especially on a couple day old snow. They've always prided themselves on shooting too. I think at one time Shane, Lanny and Lane were all state champ trap shooters. That's a lot of shooting to take two barrels out.
I've thought this as well. If you are going to track big bucks in the snow you have to be able to jump shoot at running deer. Obviously that isn't safe in a lot of places but up in the woods they hunted I don't think there is very rarely going to be another hunter within miles of them.
 

kneedragger

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Great interview. I bought a knife 20+ years ago

Along with the the knife, I got a note saying "put some blood on it this fall. LEB".

I did !

Incredible hunters and storytellers.
 
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GuyYeti

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Wow that's great kneedragger, sounds like you cherish that knife! I'm continuing to search for a LEB knife.

Thanks for everyone's comments and feedback. It truly was a great experience for me, and I hope to be able to get out and hunt with Lanny at some point this year, although life comes at you fast and there may be some obstacles in the way.
 

kneedragger

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Wow that's great kneedragger, sounds like you cherish that knife! I'm continuing to search for a LEB knife.

Thanks for everyone's comments and feedback. It truly was a great experience for me, and I hope to be able to get out and hunt with Lanny at some point this year, although life comes at you fast and there may be some obstacles in the way.
Doesnt wildernesstrader.com still have some knives for sale ? I bought the "where it all began" benoit book from them years ago. I think they were friends with M. Benoit
 

Gfedor

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I think knowing when to speed up , slow down, when to circle , keeping that track when it gets in with other deer, especially on a couple day old snow. They've always prided themselves on shooting too. I think at one time Shane, Lanny and Lane were all state champ trap shooters. That's a lot of shooting to take two barrels out.
Good point on how fast or slow to go. 2 years ago I had a nice buck sneak pass me, couldn't get a shot, saw his headgear as he snuck by, fresh snow on ground I figured give him a couple minutes then I'll track him down, well 6 hours later he never stopped and I never caught up to him.. in hindsight I should of jumped on him sooner, and moved a little faster. Lesson learned
 

Huntermc6

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Good point on how fast or slow to go. 2 years ago I had a nice buck sneak pass me, couldn't get a shot, saw his headgear as he snuck by, fresh snow on ground I figured give him a couple minutes then I'll track him down, well 6 hours later he never stopped and I never caught up to him.. in hindsight I should of jumped on him sooner, and moved a little faster. Lesson learned
Something I have gathered from reading a lot of books and forum posts as well as listening to podcast with successful trackers is they move fast. Todd Havel who I believe is from Wisconsin has talked a lot about how he doesnt worry about bumping the deer because he knows if he moves too slow and never catches him he will never get a shot. If he moves as fast as he can keeping his eyes up as much as possible while staying right on the track even if he bumps the deer at least he has gotten close and has a possible shot opportunity. If he bumps the deer he does the same thing Hal does and waits 20 to 30 minutes and then moves in on him.
 




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