In the market for base layers (long johns) Recommendations please

amclimber

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I'd give two thumbs up for merino wool. I have worn a set of minus 33 for several years. They wear well, and are extremely comfortable. I wear them in a pretty wide range of temps and always stay warm and dry. They do shrink up some in the wash.
 

outdoorsman

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The best clothes for warmth I have found are wal-mart jogging/gym pants under a pair of jeans with a pair of Carhartt overalls on top. A tight knitted hat and insulated leather work gloves are equally important.

I’ve tried various long John brands and found only the body suit type to be warm. Those type are problematic getting in and out of. They were a more of a hastle than an asset.
 

NH Mountains

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The best clothes for warmth I have found are wal-mart jogging/gym pants under a pair of jeans with a pair of Carhartt overalls on top. A tight knitted hat and insulated leather work gloves are equally important.

I’ve tried various long John brands and found only the body suit type to be warm. Those type are problematic getting in and out of. They were a more of a hastle than an asset.
You wear that clothing cutting firewood or hunting, or both?
 

outdoorsman

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You wear that clothing cutting firewood or hunting, or both?
Towards the final days of hunting season I’ll wear the combination. If it’s cold temperatures where I need that many layers I won’t cut firewood. I prefer to not buck firewood during winter months.

I’ll wear the combo winter trapping, late season hunting, ice fishing, performing winter vehicle repairs, and certain snow mobile excursions. In fact I wore such an outfit Saturday morning while the temps were in the teens as I changed the oil in my daughters car.
 

ahmoore

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Duofold brand used to be decent for the price as one layer was 45% merino wool/55% poly blend w/ other layer 100% poly. I remember when they got bought out (Champion) and decreased the merino wool to 25% and added cotton, which still seems to be the case. Too bad... I recall one of the BWB podcasts mentioning something similar about Duofold and that they had found another brand that was similar and decent.
 

Kingman Cruncher

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I’ve tried a bunch of stuff over the years as a snowmobiler. My thoughts - you guys got me to buy a pair of merino wool baselayers. I certainly line them, but the cost is a bit much. For the money, the Rocky brand, yep right at Walmart is pretty damn good. It’s got like a thin fleece material and poly pro. It breaths and is super comfy on the skin. -12 when I started on Saturday here from the camp and carried a good pace so the windchill had to be fairly severe. Pretty decent stuff for the coin.

Rocky Thermal Underwear for Men Fleece Lined Thermals Men's Base Layer Long John Set https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07WNK58D2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_ETB38H124EQ4TW8H2SQK
 

JDK

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While I don’t disagree with you KC, I’m alway struck by how warm the outer wear of snowmobiling gear is. The price you pay is how bulky it is and it is not something one would ever want to wear in a hunting situation. What I am trying to say is that I don’t think it is that easy to compare snowmobiling to hunting clothes, even under garments.
 

NH Mountains

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Towards the final days of hunting season I’ll wear the combination. If it’s cold temperatures where I need that many layers I won’t cut firewood. I prefer to not buck firewood during winter months.

I’ll wear the combo winter trapping, late season hunting, ice fishing, performing winter vehicle repairs, and certain snow mobile excursions. In fact I wore such an outfit Saturday morning while the temps were in the teens as I changed the oil in my daughters car.
I’d much rather cut and buck in the winter instead of deal with ticks and mosquitoes. I dropped around 30 trees on Sunday morning for firewood and deer food. It was 13 and I thought it was perfect weather. I was in merino bottoms with jeans and a merino top with a long sleeve outer shirt. Wool vest.
 

Kingman Cruncher

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While I don’t disagree with you KC, I’m alway struck by how warm the outer wear of snowmobiling gear is. The price you pay is how bulky it is and it is not something one would ever want to wear in a hunting situation. What I am trying to say is that I don’t think it is that easy to compare snowmobiling to hunting clothes, even under garments.
That’s fair, different sports but I only wear a gortex shell riding - pants and jacket that is the thickness of a rain jacket. Use long Johns and a fleece paint and top. So three total layers, zero insulation on the exterior. The whole layering thing has become popular to control perspiration. I’ll give you that, the outter gortex layer is warmer than wool, as I’m always pretty cold sitting during November with even a slight breeze,
 
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nomadicbohunk

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I'm not a sponsor or have any affiliation to this company but Minus 33 makes merino wool base layers that I would assume are on par with all the other companies that make them. The owner was on the Big Buck Registry Podcast a while back and is a hunter as well as the company is based out of NH. If you are looking to support a local company that one might be worth looking into. I do believe they are on the more expensive end of the base layer pricing though.
Minus 33 used to be the best value anywhere. Only really serious places would sell them and they were hard to find. Serious construction worker stores, serious hunting stores nationally known but not chains, etc. They were an epic value. I finally wore out all mine and bought some more. They were terrible. I have no idea how they are now. Just an FYI. My original ones were from New Zealand Merino and cost $75-90 for each piece. The last "good ones" I got around 12 years ago. I've still never had any that lasted that long and I go through a couple pairs a year. I might have just gotten a fluke set or something...I'll give them another chance, but I know some stores that quit carrying them because the quality went down.
 

Mainewoods

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Everyone's use and experience is going to be different. If you are sitting for long periods or snow machining, and not working up a sweat, merino wool is probably not necessary and having a thicker lofted insulation that traps warm air is the way to go. If you are going to sweat at all, it's hard to beat merino for keeping you warm when wet, and not smelling after a few days.
 




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