How big of a tree would you cut down.....

Turningleaf

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If you were going to take the time to walk into some of your hunting spots and fall a few trees to help the deer along through this winter? Would it be smaller to medium sized trees that art like twenty feet high with buds on them? What's ideal for size and type of trees? Thanks ahead of time....I'm seriously going to do this but want some advice before I pull the rip cord.
 

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Tim, I don't do much of his, but a good friend of mine does a lot of this at his place in Western MA. He hinge cuts trees that are about 3"-4" in diameter. The key is to hinge cut the tree, as it also provides them some temporary bedding cover. Make the cut 3 or 4 feet above the ground. I would never cut cedar down, that tree is too valuable for wildlife, and they don't reproduce quickly. Somebody posted a good link from the state of Maine that talked about this specifically, they said you should be protecting the cedars. My personal observations have been that the deer really love the browse from red maples. Red maples reproduce quickly, and aren't a particularly valuable tree, so I would drop a few of those. Everytime I have seen a red maple get toppled over by a wind storm, the deer seem to pick them clean.
 

Turningleaf

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Tim, I don't do much of his, but a good friend of mine does a lot of this at his place in Western MA. He hinge cuts trees that are about 3"-4" in diameter. The key is to hinge cut the tree, as it also provides them some temporary bedding cover. Make the cut 3 or 4 feet above the ground. I would never cut cedar down, that tree is too valuable for wildlife, and they don't reproduce quickly. Somebody posted a good link from the state of Maine that talked about this specifically, they said you should be protecting the cedars. My personal observations have been that the deer really love the browse from red maples. Red maples reproduce quickly, and aren't a particularly valuable tree, so I would drop a few of those. Everytime I have seen a red maple get toppled over by a wind storm, the deer seem to pick them clean.
Excellent, this is just the kind of info I was looking for. Thanks!
 

802-603hunter

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I agree with everything Escout recommended and would add that in theory hinge cutting is the gift that keeps on giving. As long as a portion of the outer section is connected the tree will put out new shoots vertcally along its stem which make for future browse.
 

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Turningleaf

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I agree with everything Escout recommended and would add that in theory hinge cutting is the gift that keeps on giving. As long as a portion of the outer section is connected the tree will put out new shoots vertcally along its stem which make for future browse.
Didn't know that but all the more important!
 

Turningleaf

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vtbbhunter

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Tim, I don't do much of his, but a good friend of mine does a lot of this at his place in Western MA. He hinge cuts trees that are about 3"-4" in diameter. The key is to hinge cut the tree, as it also provides them some temporary bedding cover. Make the cut 3 or 4 feet above the ground. I would never cut cedar down, that tree is too valuable for wildlife, and they don't reproduce quickly. Somebody posted a good link from the state of Maine that talked about this specifically, they said you should be protecting the cedars. My personal observations have been that the deer really love the browse from red maples. Red maples reproduce quickly, and aren't a particularly valuable tree, so I would drop a few of those. Everytime I have seen a red maple get toppled over by a wind storm, the deer seem to pick them clean.
great post, hinge cutting is a double whammy all wildlife will benefit from it
 

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If you were going to take the time to walk into some of your hunting spots and fall a few trees to help the deer along through this winter? Would it be smaller to medium sized trees that art like twenty feet high with buds on them? What's ideal for size and type of trees? Thanks ahead of time....I'm seriously going to do this but want some advice before I pull the rip cord.
Do you own the land?
 

Turningleaf

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Do you own the land?
Nope. But honestly I am not going to over do anything. It's public land. There are a few cedar swamps I think they are held up in and I just want to cut a few small trees down the way Brain suggested to help them out. Couple different hunting places with a few trees at each place. I'm probably not in the 100 % right but it's back in the woods and not near houses so I don't think anyone is really going to care. And I won't cut down any cedars.
 

outdoorsman

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Nope. But honestly I am not going to over do anything. It's public land. There are a few cedar swamps I think they are held up in and I just want to cut a few small trees down the way Brain suggested to help them out. Couple different hunting places with a few trees at each place. I'm probably not in the 100 % right but it's back in the woods and not near houses so I don't think anyone is really going to care. And I won't cut down any cedars.
I have always said residents of Eastern Mass have Big B@lls! Be careful and don't get yourself in a pickle.
 

Turningleaf

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I have always said residents of Eastern Mass have Big B@lls! Be careful and don't get yourself in a pickle.
Ok I'm just curious to know if you wanted to help the deer during a winter that had deep snow and intense cold how would you do it on public land?
 

SportsmanNH

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Tim, I don't do much of his, but a good friend of mine does a lot of this at his place in Western MA. He hinge cuts trees that are about 3"-4" in diameter. The key is to hinge cut the tree, as it also provides them some temporary bedding cover. Make the cut 3 or 4 feet above the ground. I would never cut cedar down, that tree is too valuable for wildlife, and they don't reproduce quickly. Somebody posted a good link from the state of Maine that talked about this specifically, they said you should be protecting the cedars. My personal observations have been that the deer really love the browse from red maples. Red maples reproduce quickly, and aren't a particularly valuable tree, so I would drop a few of those. Everytime I have seen a red maple get toppled over by a wind storm, the deer seem to pick them clean.
And I didn't think anybody read that that article I posted ;) Thought everyone was sitting back eating popcorn watching the war of words. Thanks Escout !

Here it is again. http://www.maine.gov/ifw/wildlife/species/mammals/feeding_deer.html
 

outdoorsman

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Ok I'm just curious to know if you wanted to help the deer during a winter that had deep snow and intense cold how would you do it on public land?
I would leave them be. Though I would contact the agency that manages that public land and suggest some habitat manipulation by the managing agency.
 
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Turningleaf

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I would leave them be. Though I would contact the agency that manages that public land and suggest some habitat manipulation by the managing agency.
Really? That's your plan. Sounds like red tape just waiting to happen. I think I'll go with my own plan and "live on the edge" I'd rather try to help the deer if it means having balls.
 
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outdoorsman

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Really? That's your plan. Sounds like red tape just waiting to happen. I think I'll go with my own
If you knew about deer biology you would know the amount of feed you are laying on the ground is miniscule and the trail you are laying to the yard area is a highway for predators and household dogs.

How much are you actually doing for the deer with that plan?
 

longbow

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I feed deer corn here all winter but the deer have been eating it all fall and right up to winter. For big woods deer I would cut trees and drag some alfalfa bales in there. The big woods deer up in Canada love it, and I haven't heard of any detrimental effects.
 

Turningleaf

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If you knew about deer biology you would know the amount of feed you are laying on the ground is miniscule and the trail you are laying to the yard area is a highway for predators and household dogs.

How much are you actually doing for the deer with that plan?
While I don't like the fact you insinuate I don't know about deer biology I agree you bring up a good point about making trails that would be easier for predators but it would also make trails easier for deer to use also. I would think as deer, coyotes, fox etc start to move in deep snow they are all making trails for each other. Another member on here actually said it was a good thing to walk through the woods that would help break trails Making it easier for deer to get to food sources. I think contacting a government agency would be completely futile in getting any help at all to area deer. Why wait for someone else to help when I'm willing to do whatever it takes or at leat do what I can do?
 


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