Browning Pump Rifle (BPR)

TGS

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Curious if anybody hunts with a BPR and a comparison to the Remington 760/7600?
 

SportsmanNH

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Here is a comparison between the Rem 7600 and the Browning BPR .
This article is from 2000 and claims the BPR was 1/4 lb lighter than the 7600 , but I find that hard to believe.
The couple I held definitely felt heavier than a 7600. Unless the 7600's weighed a lot more back then than they do now. Definitely felt front heavy on the ones I held. I looked up the specs a couple years ago when there was a new in box BPR on Gunbroker . I remember it weighed 71/2 - 73/4 lbs. It was a real quality rifle.

Browning discontinued the BPR because it couldn't get enough market share because of the price difference and that front heavy feel even though it beat out the 7600 in every test.

 
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Mikejd

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I have never even seen one. They look to be pretty nice but I don't see how they can be lighter the look heavy almost like a BAR with that big forest.
Probably a better made rifle then the Rems.
 

mowbizz

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I didn’t have even know they existed but I love me some Browning…
 

JDK

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A friend had one. It blew away the 7600 in all aspects except weight. Very accurate, feed well, better balance, and a slick action. He sold it due to the weight difference and says he wishes he had kept it.
 

longbow

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I found this post about the BPR that I thought was informative and interesting. Written in 2008.

"The Browning Pump Rifle was only built for a few short years.

There was nothing wrong with the triggers. It was designed to be a hunting rifle - not a target rifle - so adjusting the trigger is not necessary. I don't know why people keep trying to do that!

Where do I start?

Structurally it is one of the nicest guns out there. BUT - there is two things that you have to keep in mind if you are going to buy one.

First - they are not made anymore - so anything that you buy will be used.

Second - they do not use a standard clip - like a Remington - so you will pay upwards of $50.00 to buy one. You cannot increase the capacity of the clip - because it goes inside of the gun and is covered by a trap door.

The next thing is the most important.

Browning didn't do it's homework when it came to designing this gun.

The trigger assembly is also part of the action and when you put a gloved finger inside of the trigger guard, it makes contact with the lever to disengage the lock on the breech.

What ends up happening is that the slide comes back and the gun will not fire when the action is open.

I missed a trophy buck because of that very reason.

Instead of Browning just admitting that there was a problem and revising the trigger, they just abandoned the rifle after a very short production run. Their claims was that the gun was just to expensive to manufacture.

The very last ones made were sold for $50.00 less than the price of a new 7600 Remington.

So my opinion was that it was the gun that they targeted and the price range that they were not looking for - $450.00 - at that time.

It has a forged aluminum receiver and a forearm that is not meant to be taken apart - ever.
So if your intentions is to take this gun apart and field strip it and clean it and put it back together - forget it! When you take it apart - you run the risk of doing major damage to the mechanisms that are built into the gun to keep it clean and working properly. It has felt sweeps built into the slide mechanisms that actually cleans the slides as you pump the action.

The bottom of the trigger guard has a trap door that holds the clip inside of the gun and keeps the dirt out.

The bolt sits inside of the action tight - and does not let dirt in.

The barrel has a hard chrome lining and is chrome plated on the crown. If you keep it clean - it will last a lifetime.

The forearm is held on with one screw - they have been known to crack. Mine did and Browning replaced the whole stock and forearm - free of charge. It was a matched set and had to be matched to look properly.

ON the other hand

The Remington is a billy club, you can do what ever you want to do with it and even if you take it apart - you will not hurt it and even if you do break it - replacement parts are just a phone call away.

Remington makes a Quick Woods Action Carbine 308 - 7600 QWAC that has a 10 shot clip - I believe that it will work in your .243 Model 7600

The stocks are all interchangeable - from the early 50's to present. The forearms are all the same from the late 60's to present.

Both will shoot really well, but only one is still being made today.

The Browning will be worth more someday than the Remington - because of the number of guns made and because there was so many Remington's made"
 

ahmoore

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Jet black finish and that striping in the wood is sharp.
 
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hammertime

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I had a 308 pump BPR for a few years. Sold it to a buddy for $600 probably 10 years ago. I had the barrel shortened to 20". Maybe shorter. I can't remember. He has shot a lot of bucks with it since then. Needless to say, he won't sell it back, I've asked
 




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