And #3

Fixed blade

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Honestly it wasn't an easy track but he still went maybe 100-120 yards. We started on the track around 11, and found him around noon. I was fortunate enough that myself, my buddy, and my dad are very experienced in tracking wounded deer, and have worked together on these tracks numerous times. Honestly we would have found him probably a little quicker but we had my daughter with us and we really used it as a teaching track job for her, on what we're seeing, what we're looking for, how to track with no blood, and how to mark last blood. she was our TP girl on this track. When I saw the arrow completely disappear inside of him between his neck and shoulder I knew he was a dead deer, its just putting the pieces together after that for a quickish recovery. The three of us track together a handful of times every year but we also help others and its amazing how green alot of grown hunters are at tracking deer. More often then not we find with those hunters the instant the trigger is pulled or the arrow is released the next 10 seconds is a blur, and thats the most important 10 seconds. As soon as I shoot I try to make mental notes on the escape path but more specifically he went by that rotten stump, in front of that big rock. Also body language of the deer, and once they're out of sight sit tight for atleast 5min and just listen. With this deer I knew he went right back the same way he came, and made a note of where he crossed a logging road in front of me. I also witnessed he was not bounding, he was stretching out with his head halfway to 2/3 down, and I couldn't tell which one but one of his front legs was not stretching out as far as the other. He was also crashing which isn't normal for a normal fleeing deer. All of these notes were important because we didn't find our first blood for probably 30-40 yards, found the arrow at around 50 yards still running tracks, he didn't stop running till around 80-100 yards where he started walking and turned down hill (knew it wouldn't be much further at that point). Thats when I think his cavity was completely filled up with blood and he finally started to bleed out of his entrance wound. 30 yards later or so we found him.

Also a big tip I tell most green archery hunters is most of us have a 3d target at home. Literally every deer I hit with a bow the first thing I do when I get home is go to my 3d target and shoot it from 10' at the angle the deer was at the time of the shoot and try to recreate the elevation angle. I then study the angle of the arrow impacts the target and try to project that arrow into the deer and what vitales may be impacted. For instance you may thing you double lunged a deer, then you go home and replay it with your target and you may find, jeesh he was quartering toward me slightly and I might only get one lung and liver and I may find darker blood then what I initially would have expected, maybe I'll give that deer maybe another hour or two then what I would have at first.

I knew this deer was going to suffer trauma to arteries, lungs, liver, and guts. I knew he was probably dead 30sec after the hit. I waited 2-3 hours mainly get my friends and loved ones with me to experience the recovery with me.
This is the very type of reply I had hoped for. I do everything you did as well. I think that so many newer archers can learn from your post. Thanks for sharing.
 

Gwlambo

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VT Hunter Congratulations that is a beautiful buck, great picks and trip report. His rack looks wide, tall G-2's look to be 6-8 inches and maybe he was even trying to grow a top tine on his left beam?
Great Stuff!
 

Browseline

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That is a very nice buck you got! You are really knocking them down. Thanks for the stories and pictures.
 




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